How to Ready, Aim, Fire Someone (Part 7)

Pink slipAs we finish out this blog series, let’s do a quick review and then a few closing thoughts.
Part 1. Feedback – Keep it real. Keep it honest. Don’t make a termination a surprise.
Part 1. Written Warning – Document everything. Issue warnings with deadlines.
Part 2. Be Specific – Make sure there nothing left to interpretation. Be very clear.
Part 2. Not on Fridays – Best to not fire on Fridays. It may clear your conscience, but leave them stewing for two days. Do it early in the week.
Part 3. Cut to the Chase – We know this isn’t easy, but don’t stall. Make the dreaded meeting brief and to the point. Let the employee know “it’s for cause.” And have a witness.
Part 4. You’re Out – Have everything planned in advance so that once you’ve the let the employee go…they go. Take their personal property and call it an experience. Careful allow anyone continued access to company files (on and offline). And collect company stuff (keys, phones, laptops, etc.)
Part 5. Get it in Writing – Have them sign a release of liability.
Part 6. Who’s Doing What – Reassign Responsibilities – Figure it out a head of time. Who’s going to take on the now unassigned responsibilities?
Part 6. Staff Meeting – Call the team together. Give them an update and reassurance that all is well. Prevent rumors from getting started.

A good teamThe two most important things to remember are, (1) “Hire slow, fire fast, and (2) Do the what’s right for you and your company. When you take your time, let a poor performer stay on staff, it sends a terrible message to your team. Set the bar high, lead by example, give clear expectations, be honest and you’ll put together a great team. Might take some time, a few changes here and there, but it’ll happen. And when you have to let someone go…reread my blog.

If you have any comments, please write them below. If you’re interested in a consultation or have questions, please email me at Robert@RobertFinkelstein.com.

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