Archive for March, 2010

THE ISOLATION PROCESS, A POWERFUL PATH TO MORE SALES by Jeffrey Gitomer

Posted in "The Isolation Process, a Powerful Path to More Sales" by Jeffrey Gitomer, General Management with tags , , , , , on March 31, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

Just to mix things up a little, I’ve decided to add some of the writings of various thought leaders. Like the inspirational quotes, the beautiful images, my own personal and business blogs, and the recommended reading list, I trust you’ll like this new addition to Behind the Scenes.

THE ISOLATION PROCESS, A POWERFUL PATH TO MORE SALES by Jeffrey Gitomer

Psst — hey — com’ere. I’ve got a secret to tell you…

Sometimes prospects will stall you, sometimes they will lie to you, sometimes they won’t tell you the real reason they won’t purchase. When a prospect gives you some lame excuse (stall) about why they won’t buy now, he’s really saying, “not yet.”

There are two basic types of stalls. People stalls and thing stalls.

Thing stalls are when prospects say — I’m too busy now, your price is too high, I have too many other obligations.

Frustrating isn’t it? Want to make the stall go away? Simple. Here’s the strategy: Isolate the stall or objection as the only obstacle, and then eliminate it from the situation by asking “what if it was gone, or was not the situation…would you buy?”

Isolating and eliminating creates a new situation AND a possible sale.

You repeat the stall back to the prospect, and then take it away. For example — you say, I understand, Mr. Johnson. So what you’re telling me is if it wasn’t the fact that you were too busy, this would be a perfect opportunity for you, is that correct? (get the commitment). (then double qualify) In other words, if you had the time, you would get involved? (then say) Well let’s look at the situation closer, you say you have no time, but you also said that you’re not earning all the money you need. Maybe there’s a way to use this opportunity to buy back some of your time with increased earnings.

Another example — The prospect says I don’t have the money. You say, If you had the money, would you buy it?

The best way to handle a stall or objection is take it away, and consider new options or solutions.

You say…If it wasn’t for…then insert the stall — price, timing of workload, other obligations — would you buy it?

People stalls are worse. Does this sound familiar? Sounds good Jeffrey, but I have to talk this over with my wife, husband, boss, accountant, lawyer, the executive committee, the home office, my cat whiskers, my two year old son, or my girlfriend. People not being able to decide on their own — Don’t you hate that?

Well, here’s how to overcome it.

• First isolate the person to a decision that does not include the others.

Bill, if it was only you…what would you decide? This gives you a chance to find out how they really feel (will they support you).

• Second, double qualify the commitment. Ask — is there anything you would change or object to if it was only you?

• Third, secure the prospect’s support when he meets with the third party. support. “Bill, when you go to the others, will you support the purchase?”

• And fourth, — Find other ways to get a decision now. Suggest alternatives that might get Bill to act now without risk. Bill, since you’re in favor, and we only need your spouse’s approval, how about if we fill out the paperwork — give it to me so you can be in before the end of the month, and when your spouse says OK, we’ll be ready to go (and if your spouse says no, we’ll tear up the papers — no obligation.) Hard to say no to that.

The isolation process is a powerful way of getting to the truth, finding out the real objection, AND in about 30% of the cases actually making the sale.

– Jeffrey Gitomer –

If you’re interested in a business consultation, for more information, please refer to my Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email me at Robert@RobertFinkelstein.com. I welcome your comments below. Thank you.

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Inspirational Quotes and Images – Updated

Posted in General Management, Inspirational Quotes and Images, Life Management with tags , , , , , on March 30, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

“When we long for life without difficulties, remind us that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure.” – Peter Marshall

My Inspirational Quotes and Images page is updated daily.

To see the entire list, please click on this link.
Inspirational Quotes and Images

I invite you to subscribe to my blog, “Behind the Scenes – Life and business tools for a more successful you.” You’ll find the “Email Subscription” box on each page of my blog. If you have any business questions or comments, I’d love to hear from you. Thanks.

Recommended Reading – Updated

Posted in General Management, Life Management, Recommended Reading with tags , , , , , on March 27, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

Every Saturday, I update my Recommended Reading list. Three new books each week. I think you’ll find my suggestions thought-provoking, inspiring and educational.

This week: Great books on FINANCIAL PLANNING

To see the entire Recommended Reading list, all 96 titles, please click on the link. “Recommended Reading

*If you’re interested in purchasing any of the books on my Recommended Reading list, for your convenience, I’ve linked all the covers directly to their respective pages on Amazon.*

I invite you to subscribe to my blog, “Behind the Scenes – Life and business tools for a more successful you.” You’ll find the “Email Subscription” box on each page of my blog. If you have any business questions or comments, I’d love to hear from you. Thanks.

LET’S GET REAL by Jeff Olson

Posted in General Management, Let's Get Real, Life Management with tags , , , , on March 21, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

Just to mix things up a little, I’ve decided to add some of the writings of various thought leaders. Like the inspirational quotes, the beautiful images, my own personal and business blogs, and the recommended reading list, I trust you’ll like this new addition to Behind the Scenes.

LET’S GET REAL by Jeff Olson

“Okay, doubling a penny in a story is all very well. But I don’t see anyone offering to double my money every day for a month, not in real life. Besides, even if I could get compound interest on a money account, how am I supposed to add up compound interest in health, or relationships, or knowledge?”

Fair enough. Let’s change the question. Forget about doubling for a minute, and let’s forget about compound interest, too, for the moment. Let’s just add a penny every day, not double the penny. Do you think you could improve yourself-your health, your knowledge, your skills, your diet, your relationships, whatever area of life you want to look at – just one percent?

Wait – before you answer that, let’s make it even smaller. What if you were able to improve yourself, today, just three-tenths of one percent? That’s a 0.003 improvement – a very Slight Edge indeed. So slight, in fact, you might have a hard time even knowing how to measure it.

Now, what if you did that again tomorrow, and the next day, and kept it up every day for the next year? Remember, you’re not going to add up compound interest this time, you’re just adding on another three-tenths of one percent each day.

Here’s what will happen. The first day you’ll improve by 0.003, so little it will probably be impossible to notice. The second day, your improvement will be 0.006; the next day, 0.009, almost a full one percent. And by the end of the year, you will have improved by one hundred percent.

Doubled.

You will be twice what you are today – twice as fit, twice as wealthy, twice as skilled, twice as happy…twice as whatever it is you’ve been working on, in whatever areas you apply your daily three-tenths-percent effort. Twice the you, in just one year!

If you give yourself a year to do it, you can become twice the person you are today. Imagine having twice the net worth, twice the personal relationships, twice the health. Making twice the positive impact on the world. Having twice as much fun and enjoying twice the quality of life.

How could you possibly accomplish this? By trying twice as hard? Working twice as many hours? Have twice as positive an attitude? No – by improving three-tenths of one percent at a time.

Every day, in every moment, you get to exercise choices that will determine whether or not you will become a great person, living a great life. Greatness is not something predetermined, predestined or carved into your fate by forces beyond your control. Greatness is always in the moment of the decision.

But you have to start with a penny. And that’s the great and tragic irony of it, the sad and terrible tale of the ninety-five percent: that little penny seems so insignificant, so small, so silly…why even bother to bend over and pick it up? After all…

Can you imagine walking into your bank to deposit a single penny into a savings account? Can you imagine looking in your savings account, deposit box or piggy bank, and finding a balance of $0.01? It might as well be a balance of zero, right? How much difference is there, right? I mean, we’re talking about one penny! What could you buy with a penny?

You just might be able to buy financial freedom for the rest of your life.

– Jeff Olson –

If you’re interested in a business consultation, for more information, please refer to my Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email me at Robert@RobertFinkelstein.com. I welcome your comments below. Thank you.

Inspirational Quotes and Images – Updated

Posted in General Management, Inspirational Quotes and Images, Life Management with tags , , , , , on March 21, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

“The human heart feels things the eyes cannot see, and knows what the mind cannot understand.” – Robert Vallett

My Inspirational Quotes and Images page is updated daily.

To see the entire list, please click on this link.
Inspirational Quotes and Images

I invite you to subscribe to my blog, “Behind the Scenes – Life and business tools for a more successful you.” You’ll find the “Email Subscription” box on each page of my blog. If you have any business questions or comments, I’d love to hear from you. Thanks.

THE POWER OF RESILIENCE by Denis Waitley

Posted in General Management, Life Management, Power of Resilience with tags , , , , on March 16, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

Just to mix things up a little, I’ve decided to add some of the writings of various thought leaders. Like the inspirational quotes, the beautiful images, and my own personal and business blogs, I trust you’ll like this new addition to Behind the Scenes.

THE POWER OF RESILIENCE by Denis Waitley

It has been said that failure should be our teacher, not our undertaker. Failure is delay, not defeat. It is a temporary detour, not a dead-end. Failure is something we can avoid only by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.

It may motivate you more toward your own goals to know that some of the most famous and well-known people in modern times had to overcome obstacles as difficult as anyone before they finally reached the top. It takes persistence and total commitment to your goals, but it’s possible.

Thomas Edison’s father called him a “dunce.” His headmaster in school told Edison he would never make a success of anything.

Henry Ford barely made it through high school.

The machines of the world’s greatest inventor, Leonardo da Vinci, were never built, and many wouldn’t have worked anyway.

Edwin Land, the inventor of the Polaroid Land camera, failed absolutely at developing instant movies. He described his attempts as trying to use an impossible chemistry and a nonexistent technology to make an un-manufacturable product for which there was no discernable demand. These hurdles, in his opinion, created the optimum working conditions for the creative mind.

Joe Paterno, head coach of the Penn State University football team, was asked by the media how he felt when his team lost a game. He rapidly replied that losing was probably good for the team, since that was how the players learned what they were doing wrong.

Setbacks and failures mean little or nothing in themselves. The whole meaning of any setback — or any success, for that matter — is in how we take it and what we make of it.

We often look at high achievers and assume they had a string of lucky breaks or made it without much effort. Usually the opposite is true, and the so-called superstar or “overnight success” had an incredibly rough time before he or she attained any lasting success.

You may not know the background of a certain laundry worker who earned $60 a week at his job but had the burning desire to be a writer. His wife worked nights, and he spent nights and weekends typing manuscripts to send to publishers and agents. Each one was rejected with a form letter that gave him no assurance that his manuscript had even been read. I’ve received a few of those special valentines myself through the years, and I can tell you firsthand that they’re not the greatest self-esteem builders.

But finally, a warm, more personal rejection letter came in the mail to the laundry worker, stating that, although his work was not good enough at this point to warrant publishing, he had promise as a writer and he should keep writing.

He forwarded two more manuscripts to the same friendly-yet-rejecting publisher over the next 18 months, and, as before, he struck out with both of them. Finances got so tight for the young couple that they had to disconnect their telephone to pay for medicine for their baby.

Feeling totally discouraged, he threw his latest manuscript into the garbage. His wife, totally committed to his life goals and believing in his talent, took the manuscript out of the trash and sent it to Doubleday, the publisher who had sent the friendly rejections. The book, titled Carrie, sold more than 5 million copies and, as a movie, became one of the top-grossing films in 1976. The laundry worker, of course, was Stephen King.

Think back to a time in your life you have found difficult. Try to see what you gained as a result of what you learned, what strength you found even in the most trying time — or what strength you find now in your having overcome it. Perhaps you may never have been aware of what you gained until you think about it now. The Chinese have a saying: “Eat bitter to taste sweet.” It means that by living through painful times, we can become stronger people. I certainly agree with this, and the transformation depends on our ability to discover something beyond the pain.

A Compelling ‘Why’

I have a suitcase for you. In that suitcase there is $1 million in cash. The suitcase is sitting in a building that is about an hour’s drive from where you are now.

Here is the deal: All you have to do is get to this building in the next two hours. If you get there before the end of the two hours, I will hand you the suitcase, and you will be a million dollars richer.

There is one catch, however. If you are even one second late, our deal is off, and you will not get a dime. No exceptions! With that in mind, what time would you like to leave?

Most people would respond to that scenario by saying that they would leave right now. Wouldn’t you?

So off you go. You jump into your car and start driving for the building. You are excited and are already starting to plan how you are going to spend your million dollars. Then, suddenly, the traffic comes to a complete stop. You turn on the radio and find that there has been a series of freak accidents between you and the building, and there is no way to get there!

Now what would you do? Would you give up and go back home? Or would you get out of your car and walk, run, hire a helicopter, or find some other way of getting to the building on time?

Now let’s suppose for a minute that you are driving to an appointment at your dentist’s office. The traffic again comes to a stop. Amazingly, there have been freak accidents between you and your dentist’s office. What would you do then? Probably give up, go home, and reschedule!

What is the difference between these two situations? It all comes down to why. If the why is big enough, the how is usually not a problem. This compelling why is connected to your personal objectives, mission statement, or magnificent obsessions. It is the basis of your motivational support beam. Truly motivated people are able to identify and tap into the power of a compelling why in everything they do.

What’s Worse than “The Dog Ate My Homework”

Posted in General Management, Life Management, What's Worse than the Dog Ate My Homework with tags , , , , , , , on March 11, 2010 by Robert Finkelstein

What’s worse than the dog ate my homework? Well, how about when a client asks you for some data you have, or shall I say had, and your computer system has crashed. Ah, but you’re on top of it. You’ve backed everything up…haven’t you??

I recently saw a poll that determined that more than 50% of all businesses do not back up their computer systems. I guess the owners just don’t consider their work very valuable and that it would be so easy to recreate all of it. No, that’s not it. Not it at all. The sheer thought of a virus, fire, malware, etc. wiping out our data sends a shiver down our spine. Like the Mastercard commercials say, for most of us, all that information we’ve spent years writing, creating, assembling is…well, you know the word, priceless. Even those we have lost data in the past, still don’t back up their systems. What’s it gonna take people? The excuses range from, “It’s too expensive,” “I never remember to do it,” “It’s not going to happen to me.” Famous last words.

Just for a moment, as painful as it will be, think of what will happen to your business if everything in your computers is lost. Probably cost you at least a $1 or $2, right? I don’t think so. Is it in the $100s, $1000s or even millions?! For just a few hundred dollars, you can sleep a little better at night knowing you’ve backed it all up. So, how much is peace of mind worth to you? As a buddy of mine once said to me, “When you least expect it, expect it.” That’s the way computer viruses work.

If you’re interested in a business consultation, for more information, please refer to my Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email me at Robert@RobertFinkelstein.com. I welcome your comments below. Thank you.