Archive for November, 2011

THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE (Learning to Slow Down) from DailyOM

Posted in "The Time of Your Life (Learning to Slow Down)" from DailyOM, Life Management with tags , , , , , on November 27, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE (Learning to Slow Down) from DailyOM

When we rush through our days and lives, we fail to notice the simple beauty of living.

Throughout our lives, we are taught to value speed and getting things done quickly. We learn that doing is more valuable than merely being, and that making the most of life is a matter of forging ahead at a hurried pace. Yet as we lurch forward in search of some elusive sense of fulfillment, we find ourselves feeling increasingly harried and disconnected. More importantly, we fail to notice the simple beauty of living. When we learn to slow down, we rediscover the significance of seemingly inconsequential aspects of life. Mealtimes become meditative celebrations of nourishment. A job well-done becomes a source of profound pleasure, no matter what the nature of our labors. In essence, we give ourselves the gift of time—time to indulge our curiosity, to enjoy the moment, to appreciate worldly wonders, to sit and think, to connect with others, and to explore our inner landscapes more fully.

A life savored slowly need not be passive, inefficient, or slothful. Conducting ourselves at a slower pace enables us to be selective in how we spend our time and to fully appreciate each passing moment. Slowness can even be a boon in situations that seem to demand haste. When we pace ourselves for even a few moments as we address urgent matters, we can center ourselves before moving ahead with our plans. Embracing simplicity allows us to gradually purge from our lives those commitments and activities that do not benefit us in some way. The extra time we consequently gain can seem like vast, empty stretches of wasted potential. But as we learn to slow down, we soon realize that eliminating unnecessary rapidity from our experiences allows us to fill that time in a constructive, fulfilling, and agreeable way. We can relish our morning rituals, linger over quality time with loved ones, immerse ourselves wholeheartedly in our work, and take advantage of opportunities to nurture ! ourselves every single day.

You may find it challenging to avoid giving in to the temptation to rush, particularly if you have acclimated to a world of split-second communication, cell phones, email and overflowing agendas. Yet the sense of continuous accomplishment you lose when you slow down will quickly be replaced by feelings of magnificent contentment. Your relaxed tempo will open your mind and heart to deeper levels of awareness that help you discover the true gloriousness of being alive.

– DailyOM
http://www.DailyOM.com/

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

GET HYPNOTIZED, GET HEALTHIER by Benjamin Kligler, MD, MPH

Posted in Get Healthier" by Benjamin Kligler, Life Management with tags , , , , , , , , on November 19, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

GET HYPNOTIZED, GET HEALTHIER by Benjamin Kligler, MD, MPH

Hear the word “hypnosis” and you may think of a stage show — a guy in a turban dangling a pocket watch and making you cluck like a chicken or behave in some other silly and uncharacteristic way.

This is not at all what modern hypnotherapy is like.

Reality: Ericksonian hypnosis (named after American psychiatrist Milton Erickson, who pioneered the techniques used today) is a collaboration between you and a trained health-care practitioner that can help you achieve specific health goals.

Hypnotherapy does not use commands, such as, “Now you will do what I say.” Instead, the practitioner offers gentle, nonauthoritative suggestions when you are in a highly relaxed state. The idea behind hypnosis is that there is no separation between body and mind — so you can access the healing potential of the unconscious mind to move yourself in a healthful direction. Unlike classical hypnosis, which works on only a small subset of highly suggestible people, Ericksonian hypnosis can help almost anyone — though it is most effective for those who are motivated and accepting of treatment.

HELP FROM HYPNOSIS

Research shows that hypnotherapy helps treat a variety of physical and psychological problems, including…

* Anxiety

* Chronic pain

* Insomnia

* Irritable bowel syndrome (recurring bouts of diarrhea and/or constipation)

* Menopausal hot flashes

* Nausea

* Overeating

* Phobias, such as claustrophobia or fear of flying

* Sugar addiction

* Tobacco addiction.

Examples:
One study found that a single 15-minute hypnosis session significantly decreased pain and anxiety in women under¬going breast cancer surgery — and, for unknown reasons, also shortened the procedure time in the operating room. In another study, 68% of women with menopausal hot flashes showed reduced symptom severity and frequency, as well as decreased insomnia, after hypnosis.

How it works.
Everybody has chatter in the conscious mind that can get in the way of healthful behaviors, such as controlling consumption of sweets or not panicking in an elevator. Hypnosis quiets the conscious mind so your unconscious can come in and say, “Wait a minute, we’re trying to be healthier here” — making it easier to turn down that donut or stay calm in the elevator. Hypnosis relieves physical symptoms, such as pain or hot flashes, by reducing stress hormones that contribute to physical ailments.

Hypnosis by itself does not cure the problem — rather, it creates a heightened state of awareness that opens the way for your own willingness to bring about the desired changes. Hypnotherapy can focus on symptom reduction… strategies for coping with stress… resolution of personal problems… and/or personality development.

WHAT TO EXPECT IN TREATMENT

Typically, the first session with a hypnotherapist lasts one hour. During this visit, the practitioner asks questions about your particular problem — when symptoms began, other treatments you have tried, how the issue affects your life and stress level. Because hypnotherapy is highly individualized, this information helps determine the most appropriate treatment for you. Hypnosis may or may not be done during this first session.

A course of hypnotherapy generally ranges from three to eight sessions, with each weekly hypnosis session lasting about 30 to 40 minutes. Sometimes patients return months or years later for a “booster” session.
During a session, you sit on a comfortable chair or couch in a ¬quiet and softly lit room. Usually your eyes are closed, but you can hear everything around you.

Speaking in a soothing voice, the practitioner leads you into an induction, a trancelike state of deep relaxation. One common technique is the body scan. The practitioner asks you to focus on your feet, relaxing the muscles there. Next you focus on feeling the relaxed sensation in your ankles, your calves, your knees. Over five to 10 minutes, the practitioner guides you to relax your entire body.

While you are in a state of deep relaxation, the practitioner makes therapeutic suggestions, prompting your unconscious mind to deal more effectively with your health issue. The practitioner does not say something like, “You will not be afraid of the airplane,” but rather, “You may find yourself feeling much more -relaxed on the airplane than you have in the past.” Suggestions are tailored to the specific problem and person. The process generally is pleasant and completely safe. You do not ¬reveal personal secrets or do anything that you don’t want to do.

After the therapeutic suggestions, the practitioner typically brings you back to your normal state of consciousness by saying, “I’m going to be quiet now, and over the next few minutes, you can gradually bring yourself back to the room.” You may or may not consciously remember what was said to you during hypnosis… you may come to the end of a session thinking that it lasted just a few minutes, when in reality it lasted half an hour.

Over the following few days or weeks, you may notice that your symptoms are improving — for instance, you sleep better, feel less nauseous or fearful, or find it easier to resist cravings for cigarettes.

HYPNOTHERAPY HOMEWORK

The practitioner may assign you some simple self-hypnosis techniques to do on your own. For instance, if you are seeking to change a habit, such as compulsive overeating, self-hypnosis helps you handle cravings as they arise. These techniques typically include physical strategies, such as pressing two fingers together as a reminder of how to reach the relaxation state… or taking a series of deep breaths while focusing on a certain calming image or phrase.

For a physical problem, such as irritable bowel syndrome, the practitioner may tape-record an in-office hypnosis session and have you listen to it at home. As you reexperience the state of deep relaxation again and again, not only your mind but your entire body benefits — making your gut less susceptible to digestive upsets.

Finding a practitioner: In addition to being a licensed doctor, psychologist or social worker, a qualified practitioner should have about one year of hypnotherapy training. To ensure that your practitioner has met educational standards and training requirements in clinical hypnosis, you may want to verify that he/she is certified through the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (630-980-4740, www.asch.net).

Hypnotherapy costs about $125 to $300 per session. Although many insurance companies do not cover hypnosis per se, you may be able to collect under a mental-health ¬benefit if your psychotherapist or integrative physician includes hypnosis among the treatments offered.

– Benjamin Kligler, MD, MPH

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

WORTH IT? by Seth Godin

Posted in "Worth It?" by Seth Godin, General Management, Life Management with tags , , , , on November 16, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

WORTH IT? by Seth Godin

That’s a question you hear a lot. “Was it worth it?”

Not certain what either “it” refers to, but generally we’re saying, “was the destination worth the journey? Was the effort worth the reward?”

The thing about effort is that effort is its own reward if you allow it to be.

So the answer can always be “yes” if you let it.

– Seth Godin

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

WAIT TO WORRY by Vicki Hitzges

Posted in "Wait To Worry" by Vicki Hitzges with tags , , , , on November 14, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

WAIT TO WORRY by Vicki Hitzges


Excerpt from “Attitude Is Everything”

I used to worry. A lot. The more I fretted, the more proficient I became at it. Anxiety begets anxiety. I even worried that I worried too much! Ulcers might develop. My health could fail. My finances could be depleted to pay the hospital bills.

A comedian once said, “I tried to drown my worries with gin, but my worries are equipped with flotation devices.” While not a drinker, I certainly could identify! My worries could swim, jump and pole vault!

To get some perspective, I visited a well known, Dallas businessman, Fred Smith. Fred mentored such luminaries as motivational whiz Zig Ziglar, business guru Ken Blanchard and leadership expert John Maxwell. Fred listened as I poured out my concerns and then said, “Vicki, you need to learn to wait to worry.”

As the words sank in, I asked Fred if he ever spent time fretting. (I was quite certain he wouldn’t admit it if he did. He was pretty full of testosterone—even at age 90.) To my surprise, he confessed that in years gone by he had been a top-notch worrier!

“I decided that I would wait to worry!” he explained. “I decided that I’d wait until I actually had a reason to worry—something that was happening, not just something that might happen—before I worried.”

“When I’m tempted to get alarmed,” he confided, “I tell myself, ‘Fred, you’ve got to wait to worry! Until you know differently, don’t worry.’ And I don’t. Waiting to worry helps me develop the habit of not worrying and that helps me not be tempted to worry.”

Fred possessed a quick mind and a gift for gab. As such, he became a captivating public speaker. “I frequently ask audiences what they were worried about this time last year. I get a lot of laughs,” he said, “because most people can’t remember. Then I ask if they have a current worry—you see nods from everybody. Then I remind them that the average worrier is 92% inefficient—only 8% of what we worry about ever comes true.”

Charles Spurgeon said it best. “Anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength.”

– Vicki Hitzges

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

REPOSITIONING PEOPLE by Dr. John C. Maxwell

Posted in "Repositioning People" by Dr. John C. Maxwell, General Management with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

REPOSITIONING PEOPLE by Dr. John C. Maxwell

One of the traits of outstanding leaders is that they properly place people within a team. Good leaders have the ability to see their people, sense where they are and put them in the right place. So why do so many leaders place so many people in so many wrong places? I’ve identified five reasons.

1. Failure to know the requirements needed to make a job successful.

I’m not talking about the job description, and I’m not talking about how you do a job. I’m talking about what a particular person has to do to be successful. Make a list those qualities. It could be two or three things; it could be 10. Whatever those things are, you have to go out and find people who have a giftedness to match those qualities so that you put the right people in the right place.

2. Failure to know the skills and the giftedness of the person.

Sometimes we know what gifts and skills are required for success in a particular job, but we do a poor job evaluating the giftedness of the person we place in that position. Maybe we know a particular job needs someone who is detail-oriented, but we fail to recognize that the person we’re putting in that position breaks out in hives when overwhelmed with details.

3. Failure to move people when either the job or the person is changing.

While it’s common for people to get promoted out of a job that really fits their skills, it’s also possible for them to stay in a position so long that they no longer do it well.

As a leader, you might place someone in a position that is a great match with that person’s uniqueness and giftedness, only to look up later and realize that the person’s productivity has fallen sharply.

What happened?

Something changed. Maybe the job changed. Maybe the organization changed. Maybe the person changed. Maybe you changed. Maybe everything changed.

I have found many people end up in the wrong place only because they stayed in the right place too long. They were in the right place in the beginning, but the right place becomes the wrong place if the job changes or if the person changes. So the right place can become the wrong place over a matter of time.

4. Failure to be patient.

Sometimes the person is in the right place, but they have to grow into it. And not only do they have to grow into it, but they also have to be trained and developed into it. You know they have the giftedness, they have the ability, they have the passion; but they need time and someone to help them. Smaller organizations often can’t afford to hire the best, so they have to hire young people with great potential and then train them.

In “The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork” I write about the ‘Law of Dividends’, which is, “Investing in the team compounds overtime.” As you invest in your team, especially if you have them in the right place, the team is going to compound in a very positive way for you. Of course, if you don’t have the right players in the right place, time isn’t going to do it.

5. Failure to prepare.

Many times we haven’t done enough front-end homework as leaders, so we aren’t prepared to place people where they can grow and can blossom.

When we consistently fail to place people in the right place within the team, several things inevitably infect our team like an angry parasite. Morale suffers, people lose their willingness to play as a team and confidence erodes. As a result, potential goes unrealized, progress is hindered and our competitors benefit.

On the other hand, organizations do best when the people within them are carefully put in the right places. People are encouraged and fulfilled, growth is ensured, teamwork is increased and victories are secured. And, for leaders, there is a huge reward in seeing your players in the right place, doing the right thing for the right reasons.

– Dr. John C. Maxwell

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

RUNNING AWAY versus MOVING FORWARD (Facing Problems) from DailyOM

Posted in General Management, Life Management, Running Away versus Moving Forward with tags , , , , , on November 7, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

RUNNING AWAY versus MOVING FORWARD (Facing Problems) from DailyOM

Make sure you aren’t running away from your problems, always moving towards something.

There are times when change—moving to a new city or a new home, or changing careers—is the right thing at the right time. But there are also times when the urge for change is really just a desire to run away from problems that need to be faced rather than avoided. These are the kinds of problems that recur in our lives. For example, issues with coworkers that seem to arise at every job we take, or repeatedly getting into unhealthy relationships. A move might temporarily distract us, and even cure the problem for a time, simply by taking us out of the situation in which the problem fully manifested itself. However, the problem will eventually appear again in our new situation.

One way to make sure you aren’t running away from your problems is to notice whether you are moving towards something that is exciting in its own right, as opposed to something that is appealing only because it is not where you are now. For example, if you are leaving a city because you feel you can’t afford it, you could be reinforcing poverty consciousness, and you might find that you are unable to make ends meet in your new city as well. It would ultimately be less of an effort to stay where you are and look more deeply into your beliefs about money. You may discover that as you address these issues, you are able to make more money simply by changing your mindset. You may still decide to move, but it will be an act with a positive intention behind it and not an escape, which could make all the difference.

Any pain involved in facing our issues is well worth the effort in the end. When we face our problems instead of avoiding them, we free our energy and transform ourselves from people who run away into people who move enthusiastically forward.

– DailyOM
http://www.DailyOM.com/

If you’re interested in a complimentary 30-minute business strategy session with Chief Operating Officer, Robert Finkelstein, or for more information, please refer to Behind the Scenes Consulting. If you have questions, please email Robert at Consulting@RobertFinkelstein.com. Your comments are welcomed below. Thank you.

BOOST YOUR ENERGY IN 8 MINUTES OR LESS by Evangeline Lausier, MD

Posted in "Boost Your Energy in 8 Minutes or Less" by Evangeline Lausier, MD, Life Management with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 5, 2011 by Robert Finkelstein

Along with hundreds of inspirational quotes, beautiful images, recommending reading, and my own personal and business blogs, at “Behind the Scenes / Virtual COO” you will find the writings and videos of those whose intention is to inspire, motivate and push us to think outside the box.

BOOST YOUR ENERGY IN 8 MINUTES OR LESS by Evangeline Lausier, MD

When you feel drowsy or droop with fatigue, every task seems monumental and even fun activities feel like work.

Helpful: Take a double-pronged approach to invigoration — including on-the-spot techniques for an immediate energy burst… plus simple strategies that take just minutes to do, yet give you long-lasting stamina day after day.

FOR AN INSTANT ENERGY SURGE…

Wake up your nose — and the rest of you will follow. Aromatherapy stimulates the brain’s olfactory center and heightens awareness of your surroundings. Dab a drop of therapeutic-grade rosemary essential oil (sold at health-food stores) on the pulse points behind both ears, as you would perfume… or dampen a cloth with cool water, sprinkle it with four drops of therapeutic-grade lemon essential oil, then place it on your forehead or the back of your neck for five minutes. Do not dab full-strength essential oil directly under your nose — it could be too strong.

Belt out a few bars. As you sing, you inhale deeply, bringing more energizing oxygen into your lungs and increasing circulation throughout your body… and exhale through your mouth, efficiently expelling the waste product carbon dioxide. Bonus: Choosing a favorite cheerful song lifts your mood.

Give yourself a good stretch.
Stretching opens the chest, straightens the spine, expands the lungs and relieves energy-sapping tension in neck and shoulder muscles. Try…

Seated stretch. Sit in a sturdy chair, feet flat on the floor, hands clasped in front of you. As you inhale, straighten arms and slowly raise them over your head, turning your wrists so palms face the ceiling. Gently press arms as far back as possible, holding for a count of five. Slowly exhale, lowering arms to the starting position. Repeat three times.

Doorway stretch. Stand in a doorway, a few inches behind the threshold, with feet about six inches apart. Raise arms out to your sides and bend elbows to a 90-degree angle, placing hands and forearms on either side of the doorjamb. Keeping your back straight, lean forward slightly to feel a stretch across your chest. Hold for 15 seconds. Repeat three times.

Take 800 steps. A moderately brisk walk — at a pace of about 100 steps per minute — is an excellent way to get blood flowing to your heart and brain. Exercise also triggers the release of endorphins, brain chemicals that make you feel alert and energetic. If possible, walk outdoors — the sun’s rays activate the synthesis of mood-enhancing vitamin D.

Just breathe. The beauty of this is that you can do it anytime, anywhere, and instantly feel more alert. Good deep-breathing technique: Inhale deeply through your nose, filling your lungs for a count of four… hold your breath for a count of seven… slowly and deliberately exhale through pursed lips (to regulate the release of air) to a count of eight. Take three normal breaths, then repeat the deep-breathing exercise twice more.

Rationale: This technique pulls the diaphragm downward and creates a negative pressure that draws more blood into your heart. As the heart pumps this blood around your body, all your tissues receive extra energizing oxygen.

TO REFUEL ENERGY RESERVES…

Eat a stamina-boosting breakfast — one cup of fortified, whole-grain cereal. Whole grains are complex carbohydrates that enter the bloodstream slowly, providing sustained energy by keeping blood sugar levels stable. Avoid starting your day with simple carbohydrates, such as white toast or a doughnut, which cause blood sugar and energy levels to spike and then plummet by mid-morning.

Also: With your cereal, have one-half cup of low-fat milk or fortified soy milk. Its calcium and vitamin D nourish your bones… its protein is used to build and repair muscle and other tissues.

For snacks, go nuts. A handful of almonds, cashews, walnuts or other type of nut provides a sustained energy boost, thanks to blood sugar-stabilizing complex carbohydrates and tissue-building protein.

More benefits: Though relatively high in calories at about 160 per ounce, nuts tend not to cause energy-depleting weight gain because they promote long-lasting satiety and stave off hunger. Nuts also are rich in unsaturated fats that promote cardiovascular health.

Take a green tea break three or four times a day. Green tea contains catechins, antioxidant plant chemicals that support the immune system by neutralizing cell-damaging free radicals, fighting bacteria and easing inflammation. When your immune system is operating at its peak, you have more pep. Green tea also boosts metabolism, stabilizing blood sugar and helping to ward off weight gain… and protects against many debilitating chronic conditions, including heart disease and diabetes. Convenient: If you are going to be out and about during the day, before you leave the house, brew up enough tea to fill a thermos and take it with you.

While green tea does contain some caffeine — enough to provide a slight energy lift — its caffeine content generally is low enough not to interfere with sleep, provided that you avoid drinking it within four hours of bedtime. If you want to minimize caffeine, let the green tea bag steep for just 30 seconds, then discard that water and replace it with fresh hot water, allowing it to steep for several minutes.

If you prefer coffee:
Be aware that, with its higher caffeine content, coffee may leave you feeling even more sluggish once the caffeine buzz wears off. Limit caffeinated coffee to no more than 16 ounces per day, and consume it prior to mid-afternoon so it doesn’t interfere with your sleep.

Try energizing supplements.
Various herbal and dietary supplements help support immune function and/or reduce energy-sapping stress. Each has its own benefits as well as risks (such as possible side effects or interactions with medications or other supplements), so it is important to discuss their appropriateness and dosage guidelines with your doctor before taking them.

Options to consider: Astragalus… calcium plus magnesium… coenzyme Q10… ginseng… rhodiola… vitamin B complex.

Express yourself to lower stress. Play the piano, pen a poem, paint a picture or just doodle. The purpose: Creative self-expression is stimulating — it alleviates energy-draining stress by helping you reconnect with your deep inner well of emotional well-being.